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The 5 Coolest Places in the World & on Earth

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Antarctica

As a travel website, tripatlas.com/new is geared towards bringing you the hottest destinations and the coolest places to visit in the world. From Paris to Rome, from Phuket to Hong Kong, Vancouver to San Francisco – we feature popular, exotic and up and coming destinations. From Top 5 of the Most Expensive Desserts in the World to articles about the Top 5 Highlights in Rome, Toronto or Salzburg – we now introduce you the 5 Coolest Places in the World.

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The 5 Coolest Places in the World and on Earth

Well, it’s not London, England, as cool as fish and chips, Manchester United and the Queen may be. It’s not Hong Kong, either, no matter how much shopping and bright lights they have.

The coolest on place on earth, in the entire world is in fact – a desert.

-61.1 C 5Alaska) Prospect Creek, Alaska, United States
How Cool?
-79.8°F or -62.1°C

Prospect Creek is located just 25 miles southeast from Bettles, Alaska. It was at a pipeline camp in January 23, 1971 that this record was taken at -79.8°F or -62.1°C. It is considered the United States’ lowest temperature record.


-63 C 4) Snag in Yukon, Canada
How Cool? –
81.4°F or -63°C

YukonThe small village of Snag, Yukon takes the record for the coldest temperature in North America to have ever been recorded and was February 3, 1947. The village is located just south of Beaver Creek, Yukon and is located in a valley. This village was settled during the Klondike Gold Rush in the late 1800’s. In the mid 1900’s, only approximately 10 natives lived here along with fur traders.


-66 C

3) North Ice Station and Eismitte, Greenland
How Cool?
North Ice: -86.8°F or -66°C and Eismitte: -84.8°F or -64.9°C

GreenlandBoth recording of these temperatures at North Ice Station and Eismitte were on expeditions made by European scientists and explorers in the 1930’s (Eismitte) and the 1950’s (North Ice). Both were made on Greenland‘s inland. At Eismitte, researchers spent a 12 month period from September 1930 to August 1931 recording temperatures. July was the warmest month at an average monthly temperature of 10°F and -12.2°C. The coldest month was February at -53°F or -47.2°C.


-71.1 C

2) Oymyakon and Verkhoyansk, Russia
How Cool?
Oymyakon: -96.0°F or -71.1°C and Verkhoyansk: -89.8°F or -67.7°C

SiberiaSiberia is in fact the coldest inhabited place in the world. Oymyakon village found in Eastern Siberia, has a population of 900 and with the lowest temperatures recorded at -96°F or -71.2°C during their nine-month long winters. This region is so cold that if you take out an empty plastic bag outside, it will freeze in minutes and shatter like glass. Children are not allowed to play outside for more than 20 minutes during a winter day – to keep their lungs from freezing!

Verkhoyansk is located near the Arctic Circle and had a population of 1,434 in 2002. They have a river port, airport and fur-collecting depot. It is also a centre for raising reindeer (for Santa, no doubt).


-89.2 C 1) Vostok Station and Plateau Station, Antarctica
How Cool?
Vostok: -128.6°F or -89.2°C and Plateau: -119.2°F or -84°C

AntarcticaAntarctica is considered the coolest or coldest place on earth, inhabited only by seals, penguins and scientists for half of the year. It’s also considered a desert (the largest desert in the world!) because it has little precipitation (just less than the Sahara) – even though it’s completely covered by massive amounts of ice.

The records of the coldest temperatures in the world were taken at the Vostok and Plateau Science Laboratory Stations on Antarctica. The “coolest place” award goes to Vostok Station where the temperature reached -128.6°F or -89.2°C on July 21, 1983.